Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed Over Exploding Takata Airbag in Honda Accord

Airbag Wrongful Death Claim

Written by Faith Anderson on December 1, 2014
takata airbag lawsuit

Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed Over Exploding Takata Airbag in Honda Accord

What is believed to be the first wrongful death complaint over Takata’s exploding airbags has been brought against the Japanese airbag maker.

The family of a South Carolina woman killed in a 2008 motor vehicle accident has filed what appears to be the first wrongful death lawsuit over the defective Takata airbags installed in millions of vehicles manufactured by at least ten different auto manufacturing companies. The lawsuit was filed by the family of Mary Lyon Wolfe in the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina on November 21, and names as defendants Honda and the Japanese airbag maker Takata Corp. If you have lost a loved one to fatal injuries allegedly caused by a defective Takata airbag, contact a reputable product liability lawyer today for legal help. You may have grounds to file a complaint against Takata and also the auto maker, in order to pursue financial compensation for your losses.

Deadly Injuries Resulting from Airbag Defect

According to allegations raised in the wrongful death suit, 57-year-old Mary Lyon Wolfe was killed in February 2008, after being involved in a traffic accident with her 2002 Honda Accord. During the collision, Wolfe’s vehicle skidded off the roadway into a culvert and then crashed into a tree. The complaint states that the Accord’s airbag deployed late, and then overinflated and ruptured, causing Wolfe to be hit with excessive force and resulting in severe injuries including a cervical spinal fracture, anoxic brain injury, liver contusion and respiratory failure. Wolfe’s family claims that her death was caused by injuries associated with the faulty Takata airbags, which have been implicated in at least six deaths and hundreds of injuries.

Vehicles Recalled Over Defective Airbags

The Wolfe’s wrongful death lawsuit comes amid continuing controversy over Takata’s defective airbags, which have resulted in 14 million vehicles being recalled by Honda and other popular auto makers in recent years. According to the latest information, the Takata-made airbags may contain defective inflators, which makes them more likely to overinflate and explode, possibly sending metal shrapnel into the passenger compartment of the vehicle when the airbags are deployed. “In recent incidents, first responders have been baffled by the fact that victims of apparently minor accidents suffered injuries more consistent with being shot or stabbed repeatedly, or unexplained cervical fractures.”

A Knowledgeable Airbag Defect Attorney Can Help

In light of the potential for the Takata airbags to overinflate and explode, eight million vehicles containing the defective airbags have been recalled in the past few months alone, and earlier this month, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) called for a national airbag recall, a move that could affect millions more vehicles. If you or a loved one has suffered serious injuries allegedly caused by a faulty Takata airbag, our consumer advocates at the Consumer Justice Foundation can help. We are committed to protecting the rights of consumers harmed by dangerous or defective products, and can help put you in touch with a reputable attorney who has experience handling faulty Takata airbag claims.

Posted Under: Auto Products, Legal, News, Toyota Airbag Recall
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