Study Calls for Talcum Powder to Be Reclassified as a Possible Carcinogen

Talcum Powder Cancer Risk

Written by Faith Anderson on January 22, 2015
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Study Calls for Talcum Powder to Be Reclassified as a Possible Carcinogen

Women who use talcum powder for feminine hygiene purposes may have a significantly increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Serious concerns have been raised in recent years about the potential for talc-based powders like Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower-to-Shower Body Powder to cause ovarian cancer in women who use the products for feminine hygiene purposes. A new study supports this finding and suggests that some talcum powders used by women should be reclassified as a carcinogen, or a cancer-causing agent. If you used talcum powder for feminine hygiene purposes in the past, and you have since been diagnosed with ovarian cancer or another serious medical condition, contact a reputable talcum powder cancer lawyer today for legal help. With a qualified lawyer on your side, you can protect your legal rights and pursue the compensation you deserve for your injuries.

Potential Side Effects of Talcum Powder

According to the American Cancer Society, Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder and similar talcum powder products are made from talc, a mineral composed mainly of the elements oxygen, silicon and magnesium. As a powder, talc helps cut back on friction and absorbs moisture well, which makes it a useful product for preventing rashes and keeping the skin dry. For this very reason, women have for years been using Shower-to-Shower and other talcum powder products on their genitals for feminine hygiene purposes, and new research suggests that this particular use of talc-based body powders may actually put women at risk for ovarian cancer, caused by the talc migrating through the vagina to the uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries.

Lawsuits Over Ovarian Cancer from Talc Powder

In light of the potential risk of ovarian cancer from talcum powder, recent studies have taken a deeper look at the possible health risks associated with talc-based powders. In fact, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is part of the World Health Organization, has classified talcum powder products as “possibly carcinogenic to humans,” based on studies of genital use, reporting that “A case-control study has suggested an approximate doubling in relative risk for ovarian cancer among women with perineal use of talc, but the possibility of recall bias cannot be ruled out.” In June 2013, a study published in the medical journal Cancer Prevention Research found that women who used talcum powder for feminine hygiene faced a 20% to 30% higher risk of ovarian cancer than women who didn’t use the powders.

An Experienced Talcum Powder Lawyer Can Help

Johnson & Johnson and other makers of talc-based baby powders and body powders are facing a growing number of product liability lawsuits filed on behalf of women throughout the country who used the products for feminine hygiene purposes, and have since been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. If you believe you have been adversely affected by side effects of talcum powder, our consumer advocates at the Consumer Justice Foundation can help. We are committed to protecting the rights of consumers harmed by potentially dangerous consumer products, and can help put you in touch with a knowledgeable product liability lawyer who has experience handling talcum powder ovarian cancer claims.

Posted Under: Dangerous Products, News, Talc, United States
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