Pfizer Faces Viagra Lawsuit Over Melanoma Skin Cancer Side Effects

Viagra Skin Cancer Suit

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Pfizer Faces Viagra Lawsuit Over Melanoma Skin Cancer Side Effects

A growing number of product liability lawsuits are being filed against Pfizer over skin cancer side effects of its erectile dysfunction drug Viagra.

An Illinois man has brought a product liability lawsuit against Pfizer, claiming that the drug company failed to warn Viagra users about the potential for the popular erectile dysfunction drug to cause melanoma skin cancer side effects in users. If you took Viagra in the past, and you have since been diagnosed with melanoma or another serious medical condition, contact a knowledgeable Viagra attorney today for legal help. You may have grounds to file a Viagra lawsuit against Pfizer, in order to pursue financial compensation for your alleged drug-related injuries, medical expenses, and pain and suffering.

Pfizer Accused of Failure to Warn

In the Viagra lawsuit, filed in Illinois by former Viagra user Edward Corboy Jr., the plaintiff indicates that he was prescribed Viagra in 2008 as a treatment for erectile dysfunction, and used the drug until December 2012, when he was diagnosed with melanoma. According to allegations raised in the Viagra suit, Pfizer knew or should have known about the potential link between Viagra and skin cancer, but failed to warn consumers and the medical community about the side effect risk. Corboy states in his lawsuit that he wouldn’t have used Viagra had he known about the potential for the medication to cause skin cancer.

Melanoma Side Effects of Viagra

Viagra (sildenafil citrate) was introduced in the United States by Pfizer in 1998, and the erectile dysfunction drug is now used by millions of men suffering from impotence and sexual dysfunction, including the inability to develop or sustain an erection. In recent years however, serious concerns have been raised about the potential for Viagra to cause serious side effects in men, including a rare but deadly form of skin cancer called melanoma. Although melanoma is sometimes curable if caught early, once the cancer has spread beyond the skin and local lymph nodes, treatment becomes complicated and the disease is more likely to result in death.

Viagra Linked to 84% Increased Risk of Melanoma

Perhaps because Viagra is so widely used by millions of men across the United States, most people believe the drug is safe and associated with few side effects. However, according to a study published earlier this year in the Journal of the American Medical Association, men who take the erectile dysfunction drug may actually be 84% more likely to develop melanoma skin cancer than men who don’t use the medication. Researchers believe this may be due to the fact that Viagra lowers levels of a cancer-fighting protein known as PDE5A, which allows melanoma skin cancer cells to become more invasive.

Contact an Experienced Viagra Lawyer Today

According to the American Cancer Society, melanoma skin cancer is diagnosed in approximately 69,000 Americans every year, and results in about 8,650 deaths annually. If you believe you have been adversely affected by side effects of the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra, including melanoma skin cancer, our consumer advocates at the Consumer Justice Foundation can help. We are dedicated to protecting the rights of consumers harmed by dangerous medications, and can help put you in touch with a reputable product liability lawyer who has experience handling Viagra melanoma claims.

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